EBC Brakes Brake Repair

 

Easy guide to safe brake repair in DVD format for the DIY enthusiast from world’s number one brand EBC Brakes. This comprehensive installation DVD is available in USA formats for motorcycle brake repair or Automotive brake repair and guides the home enthusiast through the choices and procedures for a basic brake repair.

Brakes are important and regular service is advised. You should inspect brakes every 5000 miles for basic pad wear and replace disc pads when there is 2 mm or one eighth of and inch of friction material remaining on the backing plate. Do not let brake pads wear down father than this or you may suffer brake fade and brake failure making your next brake repair costly.

If you need to replace worn pads  and damaged brake rotors then this is achievable by most mechanics as a DIY work but EBC Brakes strongly recommend you to buy this DVD and view this before starting your brake repair.

The Install DVD costs $15.36 and you can purchase it at www.shopebcbrakes.com.

Brake repair normally involved jacking up the car and remove wheels one at a time , remembering to safety chock the wheels and placing car jacks or a solid support under the car for safety and checking pad thickness in the brake caliper. Pads can be removed with basic tools and care should be taken to clean the caliper parts and slider and remove all rust dirt and debris. Replacement disc pads come in many shapes and sizes and the best way to find out what pads are correct for you car is to use a reliable vehicle look-up such as is found on this useful link www.shopebcbrakes.com .

Good brakes save lives so make good choices and buy the best pads and rotors you can afford, cheap brakes don’t last as long and may fail.

 

 

EBC High Performance Brakes

 

 

Brakes are the most safety critical part of any moving vehicle and in the case of cars and motorcycles quite often when brakes are used repetitively and aggressively, standard is just not good enough. EBC Brakes makes brakes specifically for aggressive drivers. The sport street use or track-day and race use of motor vehicles and motorcycles has led to a need for higher performance brakes such as EBC Sport Rotors and EBC Brakes.

So what does high performance mean and how do we measure this performance ? Brake pads which are made of blends of  chemical resins and other ingredients are made to a budget by car builders and are one of the first thing to be changed on a vehicles brakes when users are involved in sport or race use. A high performance brake pad will be one which has good friction level and pedal feel on first application and can hold this level of performance throughout the whole braking cycles. Brakes must not “Fade” or fail under the heat of braking for performance use. Not only must high performance brakes work effectively under heat and load they must have good durability. Additives such as copper are blended into pads used on high performance brake systems to enhance durability.

Brake fluids are also tested in high performance brakes and because most fluids are hygroscopic meaning they absorb moisture, a higher specification fluid is needed and even that will need regular changing and flushing to keep brakes up to par with the target usage.

Finally, the brake rotors themselves must be of a decent quality G3000 Grey iron or better and if possible made from virgin alloy ingot rather than reprocessed irons which are common in 99% of aftermarket brakes. Years ago rotor castings used for automobile brakes were annealed or atmosphere aged to allow the castings to settle after being made. No longer does this happen due to cost restraints on brakes particularly by car builders and so the duty of care falls upon the brake pad to work effectively but not to cause damage to the brake rotor by overheat.

By virtue of the physics involved, brakes work by exchanging kinetic energy or momentum into one of three other energy forms, these being heat light or sound. There are no others. Therefore as it is desirous not to have immense noise from brakes and light would only be obtained by massive over heating of the brake rotor, heat is the method by which the energy exchange in brakes occurs.

This means that brakes can glow orange in high performance use, pads can overheat and fade and rotors could even develop cracks if the brake system is not designed correctly.

In automobile applications cooling of the components within the brakes is usually aided by the ducting of cool air which involves scoops in the front vehicles body work directing cool air as the car is driven onto the brake components. This can reduce overheating of the brakes by 30-40% and prevent caliper seal damage as well as rotor over heat and pad fade.

For help in finding the right High Performance brakes for your vehicle visit www.shopebcbrakes.com

 

 

 

EBC Brake Fluid

Your guide to buying correct brake fluid or changing fluid for your car and saving yourself a huge repair bill. We recommend using EBC Brake Fluid.

Vehicle brakes use hydraulic brake systems that use brake fluid to transfer the pressure of the braking action from the drivers pedal or lever to the master cylinder and then on to the caliper and brake pads. Sounds simple right?

In fact it is far from that, vehicle brake hydraulics systems are a carefully balanced and precision system that needs respect for cleanliness when servicing and most important the right type of brake fluid to be used.

There are two basic groups of brake fluid, Glycol fluids and silicone fluids (there are also one or two cars in France using mineral fluids but we leave that aside for the purpose of this article).

Glycol fluids are the most common and used in 99.9% of motor vehicles in various grades. They are named by their DOT (Department of Transport coding) either DOT 3,4 or 5. The higher the letter the higher the brake fluid quality.

Most cars run happily on DOT 3 brake fluid which is a basic fluid that has a low water content. Yes shocked you may be but water is in all Glycol fluids and the scary part is that being hygroscopic the fluids actually ingest water over years of exposure to the elements and water content over 10 years can be as high as 14%. Think about what that does for corrosion inside your brake system and how that reduces the effectiveness of your brakes and promotes brake fade as the water vaporize in extreme brake use when the caliper gets hot.

DOT 4 is basically the same fluid with more water refined out from the brake fluid. DOT 4 will give you a slightly firmer pedal but note, if you leave a can of DOT 4 fluid standing once the seal is broken within a few weeks it will be DOT 3 or worse. For this reason always use brake fluid from a sealed container and buy it in small bottles NOT gallon drums. Some Companies like EBC Brakes refuse to sell brake fluid in anything more than a top up bottle and quite rightly so . As a performance brake supplier selling brake fluid in gallons opens up a whole barrel of worms.

Within the Glycol fluid range some manufacturers have used their own coding because some bright spark years ago started applying the DOT5 code to glycol fluids when the world regard DOT 5 as being a Silicone fluid. One such blend of highly refined brake fluid known as BF307 is worth a look and is a highly refined glycol for sports cars and race use and has a 307 degree boiling point.

Boiling point is important for performance driving, the higher the boiling point the better but it is also worth noting that if any brake caliper itself gets above 250 degrees in temperature you have a problem, not even a Formula one car uses heat paint indicators above 250 degrees C.

Glycol fluids draw water in through the hoses in your vehicle which you will be amazed to hear are also to a tiny degree porous. That’s why it is wise for drivers to flush and replace brake fluid every 5-6 years to refresh those tired old brakes.

There are several other things to note about Glycol brake fluids. First they are toxic so never drink or ingest them and secondly they are very caustic so when working with Glycol brake fluids keep them fluid and contaminated rags or your fingers away from vehicle paintwork. Wash off any spills quickly with soapy water.

Silicone Brake Fluids are another story, they are not toxic (although it is never good sense to drink any such fluids) and not caustic. For this reason some classic car and motorcycle builders use silicon fluids to avoid paintwork and plastic damage. Harley Davidson for example use silicone fluids in some bikes.

Always check the spec of brake fluid on your vehicle master cylinder or in the manufacturers handbook.

Mixing glycol and silicone fluids is definitely not advised, it causes an interface and the pressure transfer does not happen effectively and certain caliper and cylinder hydraulic seals which may be synthetic rubber are designed for one type of fluid and are destroyed by the other.

Once you have flushed and changed your brake fluid you will need to bleed the brakes.